Follow Your Own Rainbow – LGBT Travel

Gay travel started out as a relatively underground business and typically, confined to the likes of sunny beach holidays with a scene that promoted wild nightlife.

These days the LGBT business is a brand, and remains progressively lucrative. Straight businesses are cashing in on the pink pound and waving the rainbow flag as high and proudly as they can. Why, because like the Beverly Hillbillies T.V. show, if they dig down into the gay soil successfully, they will strike oil.

Pink Pound

As a gay man, I’ve always shied away from the quintessential gay holiday. Well not always, I’m only human and there is something comforting about being surrounded by LBGT travellers, but adventure travel is my passion.

I was convinced that gay men and women wanted to follow me down the dusty adventure trail. So much so, that I started my own gay tour operator called Yellow Brick Road Tours. I was interviewed by the BBC and took bookings, but my customers simply didn’t want adventure travel, they wanted beach holidays which I had little interest in selling.

The Kiwi Has Landed

What does gay travel mean to me?
Honestly, it doesn’t factor in where I travel, how I travel, or whom I travel with. Being gay doesn’t define who I am, nor where I travel to. So by which marketing methods does the straight adventure market hope to attract the LGBT market? I’m just as curious as you in all honesty, but I have seen some very cliché attempts.

A common saying I hear a lot, and this is my opinion only so please don’t send me hate mail, is the LGBT community boycotting destinations where homosexuality is illegal. This comment has always struck me as ridiculous, mainly because I don’t impose limitations on myself, and if my plan is only to see the country, experience the culture, meet the locals and try new cuisine, how does being gay put me at risk? If it’s more down to a point of ethics, who is really missing out?

Is it the local people who have the same laws dictated to them (including gay men and women)?

Is it business owners who are losing out on ‘cashing in’ on the pink pound?

Or could it be the gay traveller who doesn’t experience all this new country has to offer?

New Zealand

It’s all about the research
I get it, some gay travellers have zero interest in leaving the beach so it comes down to personal preference, this is perfectly fine. My advice to anyone thinking of ditching the suitcase on wheels in favour of a backpack, is do your research before boarding the plane. Know what is acceptable and offensive to the locals.

For example, when I lived in China 14 years ago, being gay was something of a taboo and HIV posters had just started popping up at train stations. It wasn’t acceptable to wander around Tiananmen Square holding hands and kissing, but when I did my research, there were excellent gay bars and clubs where I could feel right at home. It comes down to research but that goes for all aspects of travel; what injections do I need? Where can I change currency? What is the religion and will acting a certain way be offensive? Are there any gay bars which I can pop to after a day exploring my new surrounds?

Ever looked at a beach holiday in the Maldives with your partner? Yes, as have I, and those huts on the water look too divine for words but you’ll need to do your research, gayness of any sort runs the risk of the death penalty. Hotels such as the Sheraton or Hilton Conrad welcome the pink pound, will allocate you a double bed, but you’ll need to discreet. Please note I didn’t say don’t be gay, I said be discreet, there is a big difference.

Gay travellers I’ve met
I’m not saying gay travellers don’t travel past beaches; all you have to do is read my blogs or follow ‘Travel Geek UK’ who has an assortment of blogs from very sexy locations around the globe. I’ve met gay travellers in some far off places such as Egypt, Antarctica, Colombia, China, New Zealand and many more. When I worked as an adventure guide in Egypt, Jordan, China and Japan, I had LBGT travellers join my tours who simply found group travel safer and easier. There are of course gay tour operators who specialise in travel for gay men such as ‘Out Adventures’ and do an excellent job of it!

The Kiwi Has Landed

Gay locals I’ve met
Gay locals are a great way to feel at ease and add a bit of personality to your trip. They can provide a safety net and point you in the right direction if there is a scene to explore. There may not be any scene so you’ll need to work out how important this is to you before choosing a destination. Finding a gay tour guide online before you travel is a smart thing to do if you’re concerned.

Remember it is not always a one way street. I met a closeted gay bar owner in China where I took my travel groups to many times, he found it tough living in a small town and appreciated the chance to be able to loosen up and flirt a bit with westerners.

The Yellow Brick Road Beach Holiday
Gay men and women will continue travel to beach destinations such as Sitges, Mykonos, Gran Canaria, and Key West; it is the bread and butter for British gay travellers and let’s face it, who doesn’t enjoy a week in the sun when Jack Frost is nipping in the UK. My point is there are so many other places in the world, some offering incredible experiences where you can finish your holiday on the beach so you get the best of both worlds.

Do your research before travelling and if you’re concerned, try connecting online with a gay local guide where you can ask the right people the right questions. I’m always happy for you to email me questions about specific countries or for contacts.

China

For any gay men and women thinking of travel plans further afield but on the fence? What have you got to lose! You need to take the leap of faith and embrace the fact you’re not in Kansas anymore!

Happy travelling folks!

Why not read why dating a man who travels is the way forward!

Danakil Depression

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